9 famous temples in Indonesia

Borobudur Temple


Borobudur  is a 9th-century Mahayana Buddhist Temple in Magelang, Central Java, Indonesia. The monument consists of six square platforms topped by three circular platforms and is decorated with 2,672 relief panels and 504 Buddha statues. A main dome, located at the center of the top platform, is surrounded by 72 Buddha statues each of which is seated inside a perforated stupa. It is the world’s largest Buddhist temple, as well as one of the greatest Buddhist monuments in the world.

Prambanan Temple

Prambanan Temple Compounds consist of Prambanan Temple (also called Loro Jonggrang), Sewu Temple, Bubrah Temple and Lumbung Temple. Prambanan Temple itself is a complex consisting of 240 temples. All the mentioned temples form the Prambanan Archaeological Park and were built during the heyday of Sailendra’s powerful dynasty in Java in the 8th century AD. These compounds are located on the border between the two provinces of Yogyakarta and Central Java on Java Island.

Sewu Temple
Sewu is an 8th-century Mahayana Buddhist temple located 800 meters north of Prambanan in Central Java. Candi Sewu is actually the second largest Buddhist Temple in Indonesia after Borobudur. Candi Sewu predates nearby "Loro Jonggrang" temple. Although originally only around 249 temples are present, the name in Javanese translates to 'a thousand temples,' which originated from popular local folklore; The Legend of Loro Jonggrang. The original name of this temple compound is probably Manjusrigrha.

Mendut Temple

Mendut Temple is a Buddhist temple built by King Indra of Syailendra Dynasty. Mendut Temple niches became the throne for a large Buddha statue.
The temple is located about three kilometres east from Borobudur. Mendut, Borobudur and Pawon, all of which are Buddhist temples, are located in one straight line. There is a mutual religious relationship between the three temples, although the exact ritual process is unknown

Brahu Temple
Brahu temple is the biggest temple in Trowulan. Brahu is supposed come from “Wanaru” or “Warahu”, which is name of holly building that mentioned in a cooper inscription “Alasanta” that found in west side of this temple. Brahu temple is made of red bricks and plain without decoration. It is located in Jambu Menta sub-village, Bejijong village, Trowulan district, Mojokerto regency.

The temple that looks out on west is rectangle building with 22,5 m length, 18 m width, and 20 m height. Its building consist three part, which is foot, body and roof. Seen from its style, this temple is supposed to Buddha temple that built in 15 century. Based on Mpu Sendok inscription (861 Saka or 9 September 939 M), this temple is place to burn Kings Brawijaya death body (crematorium). But in some research, they never found any death body ash in the temple. The restoration of this temple is done in 1990 – 1995.

Banyunibo Temple

Banyunibo (Javanese: "dripping water") is a 9th-century Buddhist temple located in Cepit hamlet, Bokoharjo village, Prambanan, Sleman Regency, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The temple, dating from the era of Medang Kingdom, sits in a narrow valley surrounded by paddy fields about two kilometers southeast of the Queen Boko archaeological park on the east side of modern Yogyakarta. Further north is the Prambanan temple, and to the south are the Gunung Sewu hills, extension of Gunung Kidul hills.

Cetho Temple
Ceto (Candi Ceto) is a fifteenth-century Javanese-Hindu temple that is located on the western slope of Mount Lawu  on the border between Central and East Java provinces.

Cetho is one of several temples built on the northwest slopes of Mount Lawu in the fifteenth century. By this time, Javanese religion and art had diverged from Indian precepts that had been so influential on temples styles during the 8-10th century. This area was the last significant area of temple building in Java before the island's courts were converted to Islam in the 16th century. The temples' distinctiveness and the lack of records of Javanese ceremonies and beliefs of the era make it difficult for historians to interpret the significance of these antiquities

Ngawen Temple
Ngawen (known locally as Candi Ngawen) is an 8th-century Buddhist temple compound in Magelang Regency, Central Java, Indonesia. Located in Ngawen village, Muntilan sub-district, 6 km (3.7 mi) to the east of Mendut temple or 5 km (3.1 mi) to the south of Muntilan town center. Ngawen temple compound consists of five temples, however today only one is successfully reconstructed.