Museum of The Asian-African Conference


The first large-scale Asian–African or Afro–Asian Conference—also known as the Bandung Conference—was a meeting of Asian and African states, most of which were newly independent, which took place on April 18–24, 1955 in Bandung, Indonesia.

The Asian-African Conference gained a big success both in formulating common concerns and in preparing operational guidance for cooperation among Asian African Nation as well as in creating world order and world peace. The conference has had a result Dasasila Bandung, which became the guideline for the colonized countries in fighting for their independence. It also became the fundamental principles in promoting world peace and international cooperation. The success of the conference was not only for the time being but also for the time after so that the soul and spirit of the Asian-African Conference becomes one of the most important factor that deciding world history.

All is a huge prestige that gained by the Asian African Nations. The spirit of Bandung had succeeded in widening the work volume among Asian African Nations. As a consequence, their influence and their role in international cooperation are increased and more respected. 
In order to maintain those mentions above, it is important if the Asian-African Conference with its event is maintained eternally in a museum where the conference was held, Gedung Merdeka, Bandung, a city that is considered as a capital city and a source of inspiration for the Asian-African Nations.

Inspired by desires to eternalize the Asian-African Conference, the idea of establishing a Museum of the Asian-African Conference in Gedung Merdeka was born by Prof. Dr. Mochtar Kusumaatmadja, S.H., LL.M.. The idea was delivered in the meeting of the Committee for the Commemoration of the 25th Anniversary of the Asian-African Conference (1980), which was attended by Directorate General of Culture, Prof. Dr. Haryati Soebadio as a representative for the Department of Culture and Education. Fortunately, the idea was fully supported including President of the Republic of Indonesia, Soeharto.

The idea of establishing the Museum of the Asian-African Conference had been materialized by Joop Ave, the Executive Chairman of the Committee of the 25th Anniversary of the Asian-African Conference and Director General of Protocol and Consular in the Department of Foreign Affairs in cooperation with Department of Information, Department of Education and Culture, the Provincial Government of West Java, and Padjadjaran University. The technical planning and its execution was carried out by PT Decenta, Bandung. 

The Museum of the Asian-African Conference was inaugurated by President of the Republic of Indonesia, Soeharto on 24th April 1980 as the culmination of the 25th Anniversary of the Asian-African Conference.

The Museum of the Asian-African Conference has a permanent exhibition room, which exhibits collections of three-dimensional objects and documentary photos of the preparatory Tugu Meeting, the Colombo Conference, the Bogor Meeting and the Asian-African Conference 1955.

The exhibition room also provides:
- the historical events that become the background of the Asian- African Conference;
- the effect of the Asian-African Conference to the world;
- Gedung Merdeka from time to time;
- Profile of participating countries of the Asian-African Conference performed in multimedia.

In the Museum has also a library provides books on the history, social, politics, and cultures of the Asian African Countries and others; documents of the Asian-African Conference and its preparatory conferences; magazines and newspapers donated by other institutions or gained through purchase.