Ancient Animals is still Living In Indonesia

Indonesia, actually is quite amazing because in this country  still found a variety of unique ancient animals. Their population is few and the sustainability must be protected. Here are ancient animals that still exist in Indonesia. You can tour and explore Indonesia to find them.

1 Komodo

Komodo also know as the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis),  or the Komodo monitor, is a large species of lizard found in the Indonesia islands, named of komodo Island. Komodo growing to a maximum length of 3 metres (10 ft) in rare cases and weighing up to approximately 70 kilograms (150 lb).

As a result of their size, these lizards dominate the ecosystems in which they live. Komodo dragons hunt and ambush prey including invertebrates, birds, and mammals. It has been claimed that they have a venomous bite; there are two glands in the lower jaw which secrete several toxic proteins. The biological significance of these proteins is disputed, but the glands have been shown to secrete an anticoagulant. Komodo dragon group behaviour in hunting is exceptional in the reptile world. The diet of big Komodo dragons mainly consists of deer, though they also eat considerable amounts of carrion. Komodo dragons also occasionally attack humans in the area of West Manggarai Regency where they live in Indonesia.

Komodo dragons were first recorded by Western scientists in 1910. Their large size and fearsome reputation make them popular zoo exhibits. In the wild, their range has contracted due to human activities, and they are listed as vulnerable by the IUCN. They are protected under Indonesian law, and a national park, Komodo National Park, was founded to aid protection efforts.

2  Leatherback sea turtle
The leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), sometimes called the lute turtle, is the largest of all living turtles and is the fourth heaviest modern reptile behind three crocodilians. It is the only living species in the genus Dermochelys. It can easily be differentiated from other modern sea turtles by its lack of a bony shell. Instead, its carapace is covered by skin and oily flesh. Dermochelys coriacea is the only extant member of the family Dermochelyidae.

Leatherback turtles can be found primarily in the open ocean. Scientists tracked a leatherback turtle that swam from Indonesia to the U.S. in an epic 20,000 km (12,000 mi) foraging journey over a period of 647 days. Leatherbacks follow their jellyfish prey throughout the day, resulting in turtles "preferring" deeper water in the daytime, and shallower water at night (when the jellyfish rise up the water column). This hunting strategy often places turtles in very frigid waters. One individual was found actively hunting in waters that had a surface temperature of 0.4 °C (32.7 °F).

3.  Arowana
Arowanas are freshwater bony fish of the family Osteoglossidae, also known as bonytongues. In this family of fish, the head is bony and the elongated body is covered by large, heavy scales, with a mosaic pattern of canals. The dorsal and anal fins have soft rays and are long based, while the pectoral and ventral fins are small. The name "bonytongues" is derived from a toothed bone on the floor of the mouth, the "tongue", equipped with teeth that bite against teeth on the roof of the mouth. The arowana is a facultative air breather and can obtain oxygen from air by sucking it into its swim bladder, which is lined with capillaries like lung tissue.

Arowana fish is one of the ancient fish that has not extinct yet. Studies of genetic and fossil findings show, these fish have been living on the earth at least since 220 ​​million years ago. Arowana is the carnivorous fish inhabiting the river and lake habitats. These fish can be found in the Amazon, and in parts of Africa, Asia and Australia. Arowana Fish (Scleropagus sp.) Can be found in freshwater Indonesia. One kind of Arowana is a super red and can be found in Kapuas River and Sentarum Lake in West Kalimantan . These waters are areas of peat forest creates a primitive environment for these ancient fish.

4. Saltwater crocodile
The saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus), also known as saltie, estuarine or Indo-Pacific crocodile, is the largest of all living reptiles, as well as the largest terrestrial and riparian predator in the world. The males of this species can reach sizes of up to 6.7 m (22 ft) and weigh as much as 2,000 kg (4,400 lb)

saltwater crocodile  can be found ranging from the Bay of Bengal (India, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh) to the Fiji Islands. Indonesia became a favorite habitat for saltwater crocodile  beside Australia.

5. Pangolin
A pangolin  (also referred to as a scaly anteater or trenggiling) is a mammal of the order Pholidota. The one extant family, Manidae, has one genus, Manis, which comprises eight species. A number of extinct species are also known. A pangolin has large keratin scales covering its skin, and is the only known mammal with this adaptation. It is found naturally in tropical regions throughout Africa and Asia. The name pangolin comes from the Malay word pengguling, meaning "something that rolls up".


Pangolins are nocturnal animals who use their well-developed sense of smell to find insects. The long-tailed pangolin also is active by day. Other species of pangolins spend most of the daytime sleeping, curled up into a ball.


Arboreal pangolins live in hollow trees, whereas the ground dwelling species dig tunnels underground, to a depth of 3.5 metres (11 ft). Pangolins are also good swimmers.